Things to consider when commissioning a painting.

People often ask me what needs to be considered before commissioning a painting. I realise I speak about this all the time but I don’t think I have ever written it down in an article! So here it is. Here are some things I think it’s important to think about when looking to buy or commission a piece of bespoke art. 

Photo taken by Estila Magazine

1) The location of the painting. It’s important to take note of the colour scheme in the room where the painting will hang. I like to look at the colour of the cushions, curtains, floorboards and any other features.  If it’s in an office, then I like to look at the office colours and company branding. I also check with the client to see if they would like me to highlight any particular colours that feature in the room. 

2) Where the light is. As I use a lot of mirrors, gold and other light-catching mediums, it’s important to look at the places where the light enters the room. This helps to highlight certain aspects of the painting and use light to my advantage. 

3) The size of the painting. It’s important with big paintings not to overcrowd the space. The painting needs space to breathe. With my standard painting size of 100 x 150 cm, quite a bit of space is required. But I would rather a painting be slightly too small for space than the other way round. When paintings hang in cluttered spaces, it’s hard for the eye to isolate the paintings from the surroundings. 

Some people have quite a large space but do not necessarily want a really big painting. In these situations, the use of Triptychs and diptychs can be important. Personally, I love to work in a triptych. I find it exciting and very pleasing to work in threes. Plus I love the continuation of a piece from one canvas to the next. I find it interesting looking at the space in between the canvases and using this to my advantage.

4) Use of sentimental material. Often in my pieces, I like to use material that means something to the person I am to create the work for. For example, I once had a client who loved the metro. So in his painting of a Tuscan village,  I used bits of old vintage metro maps for the basis of the windows. I then painted over them. The effect was very subtle but profound for the client. See the finished piece here!

If you would like to see more examples of my work and find out more about the process, please visit my commission page. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading this guide, and please do get in touch if you have any questions! 

Natasha Jade x

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